Family, Kids & Yourself, Live Consciously, Mindfulness & Meditation

Why Cultivating Self-Worth Leads to Healthier Choices (and How to Do It)

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By Jolene Boris, NLC

Our human minds are tricky when it comes to making changes and breaking habits.

One big factor that impacts our ability to make healthy food choices, for example, is how we measure our self-worth. How we feel about ourselves and the emotions we associate around food and diet are complex, so self-worth’s impact on our health and weight-maintenance is subtle yet powerful.

For example, It is a shared experience to fall victim to measuring one’s self-worth based on the number on a scale. To counter that, in the Nutritious Life Studio community (which you automatically are a part of after you become Nutritious Life Certified!), we actively support clients to expand their sense of self beyond that. We eat well to serve our bodies and advocate for that feeling of worthiness that says “we all deserve to feel good, and food can be our best ally in that pursuit.”

RELATED: 5 Smart Ways Wellness Experts Manage Emotional Eating

Strengthening your ability to show up for yourself and sustain self-worth may help you in making healthy life changes.

But how do you get there?

How to Cultivate Self-Worth

Metta meditation was brought to the West by renowned Buddhist teacher Sharon Salzberg. It gives us an opportunity to honor our pursuit of self-resilience and renewal by offering ourselves blessings.

self-worth

The Exercise

Select a time of day that works best for you to sit comfortably, in a relaxed way, with your eyes closed for five to ten minutes in a quiet space. Gently repeat these blessings to yourself with an intention to let go of analysis or expectation. Dedicating yourself to this practice for five to ten minutes daily will help sustain a strong foundation. Please feel free to incorporate these blessings in other moments throughout the day, when you have time for a moment of reflection.

May I be happy

May I be safe

May I be healthy

May I be at ease in my heart

This may feel awkward to you if you’re someone who’s self-critical and is always taking care of others, but as you build your self-worth, you’ll enhance your ability to serve others in a more fulfilling and balanced way. These blessings will also help you illuminate self-criticizing thoughts and challenge flawed theories of who you are. In the end, the practice of positive well-wishing may strengthen your will to show up for yourself and make healthier choices daily.

It will also begin to open your heart in a way that invites positive change. The blessings upend the negative script you’ve written about yourself, and eventually, the negative thoughts lose power—that’s what I wish for you.

In truth, the judgy voice inside you gets quieter, and from that state of positive self-worth, you’ll be empowered to make healthy choices.

(Photos: Shutterstock)


self-worthJolene Boris, MS, RD, CDN, NLC, is a registered dietitian and reflexologist. She began her studies at New York University where she received her master’s degree in clinical nutrition and food studies. She began working as a licensed dietitian at New York Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital.  Eventually, she transitioned to a private practice setting, working as part of Keri Glassman’s Nutritious Life Team. She is certified in Adult Weight Loss and Weight Management from the Commission of Dietetics. She also graduated from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition as a holistic nutrition coach. She completed her reflexology training with board-certified practitioner Annalise Evanson, with whom she also obtained her master-level certification in Reiki.  Jolene lives in Chicago, where she advanced her studies in reflexology and meditation with her teacher, Eric Huffman, and is currently a practitioner at Deep Heart Reflexology in West Town.

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