In the Kitchen with Keri: The Fastest Energy-Boosting Breakfast, 3 Ways

scramblesWe share heaps of healthy information on Nutritious Life’s blog every day, but “In the Kitchen with Keri” is your chance to spend some quality time with the wonder woman behind it all, Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN. It’s where she invites you into her space to share the ingredients she’s currently obsessed with, recipes she can’t get enough of, and other tips and tricks learned over many years of life as an always-ahead-of-the-curve nutritionist and wellness expert.


For some reason, I don’t like eggs in omelet form. I don’t really know why, but I feel like when you take a bite, you don’t taste the flavors as much. I just prefer the consistency of scrambles.

Plus, making a scramble is so super fast. It’s an easy, messy dish, that basically just requires throwing everything into a pan. As a busy mom, that’s my kinda meal.

RELATED: How Staying Organized Helps a Busy RD (and Mom) Eat Well

Finally, it’s a flexible food—like a smoothie. You can add so much flavor and variety by using different leftover roasted vegetables, meats, cheeses, and herbs. Nearly every combo ends up as a dish packed with protein, veggies, and antioxidants.

I first got into scrambles from my many Los Angeles trips, they’re more popular on the West Coast; here’s how I’ve been making them at home.

scrambles

How to Scramble

First of all, buying healthy eggs can be confusing, so you may want to brush up on what the many labels actually mean.

Some people add milk or water to make the consistency a little fluffier. You can definitely do that, but I usually just whisk up the eggs (about two per person) on their own. I use my Curtis Stone non-stick pan. Sometimes I’ll use avocado oil spray or a little grass-fed butter, especially when I’m making scrambles for the kids.

RELATED: What Does Grass-Fed Really Mean?

scrambles

In terms of add-ins, I love using  leftover veggies like asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, and mushrooms. I don’t do a lot of cheese, but I do love mushrooms with goat cheese, or asparagus with Parmesan. Onions also add a lot of flavor, as does adding in herbs and spices, like cayenne, oregano, or basil.

I’m not a huge fan of spinach or tomatoes in my scrambles because they make the whole thing just too watery. I also don’t like avocado (in eggs that is); warm avocado freaks me out! (I add fresh tomatoes and avocado on top or on the side, after the eggs are cooked.)

Here are three scrambles I made recently that took under ten minutes and were totally delicious and of course, super nutritious:

3 Fast, Nutritious Scrambles

For this vegetarian one, I chopped up leftover asparagus, snap peas, and green beans and added those to the pan with the eggs. When it was done, I sprinkled goat cheese on top.

scrambles

Next, I sauteed organic chicken sausage (you can get it pre-cooked from clean brands like Applegate!)  in the pan with the eggs and then folded in spinach at the very end, to keep it up from getting watery. This one would be great post-workout thanks to the extra protein.

scrambles

Finally, for fish lovers, I chopped up leftover asparagus and ripped up some strips of lox (smoked salmon). Both went into the pan with the eggs.

scrambles

Follow my lead and get creative with your ingredients. The best part about scrambles is they’re really, really hard to mess up. You got this!

More Like This: